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3D Bioprinters: The Main Manufacturers on the Market

Bioprinting is a technique that allows the creation of various cellular structures from a bioink composed of stem cells. This ink is usually extruded by a machine that is similar to a Fused Deposition Modeling 3D printer. Most 3D bioprinters are based on the same principle: they deposit the material layer by layer, usually using a syringe. However, there are 3D bioprinters that use a laser as an energy source or that deposit the bioink drop by drop, like a Material Jetting 3D printer. We have selected 12 3D bioprinters, some are currently on the market, others are exclusively for research purposes. These are sorted alphabetically by manufacturer’s name.

3D Bioprinting Solutions

3D Bioprinting Solutions is a laboratory for biotechnological research that opened in 2013 and founded by INVITRO, the largest private medical company in Russia. The first solution from 3DBio was launched in 2014, named Fabion, this bioprinter is a multifunctional device that works with different materials. Soon after, an updated version FABION2 was unveiled, this newest solution is capable of bioprinting with single tissue spheroids. Since, the company has been developing a new type of bioprinter, based on magnetic levitation, meaning it could be used in Space.

Credits: 3D Bioprinting Systems

3D Cultures

Aether, the San Francisco-based startup offers an AI-enhanced 3D bioprinting platform called Aether 1. Aether 1 is a multi-material bioprinter, it can work with up to 24 materials at a time, including viscous pastes, gels, ABS and PLA, liquids, ceramics and foods. This is a 3D bioprinter for researchers, artists, and innovators in diverse fields including biology, regenerative medicine, pharmaceutical, medical devices, materials science and much more. It comes with 8 pneumatic syringe extruders with vertical retraction system and the maximum build size is 315 x 229 x 132 mm.

3d bioprinters

Credits: 3D Cultures

Aether

Aether, the San Francisco-based startup offers an AI-enhanced 3D bioprinting platform called Aether 1. Aether 1 is a multi-material bioprinter, it can work with up to 24 materials at a time, including viscous pastes, gels, ABS and PLA, liquids, ceramics and foods. This is a 3D bioprinter for researchers, artists, and innovators in diverse fields including biology, regenerative medicine, pharmaceutical, medical devices, materials science and much more. It comes with 8 pneumatic syringe extruders with vertical retraction system and the maximum build size is 315 x 229 x 132 mm.

3d bioprinters

The Aether 1 3D printer

Allevi

Allevi is a young American company that started developing its 3D bioprinters in 2014, under the name BioBots. The company currently has four 3D bioprinters: Allevi 1, Allevi 2, Allevi 3 and Allevi 6. The name of each one actually indicates the number of extruders on the machine. Allevi’s technology uses LED photocuring with blue and ultraviolet light, and allows to work with several biomaterials such as collagen, matrigel, methacrylate, graphene, etc. This opens up possibilities in terms of fabric development for different needs.

3d bioprintersAspect Biosystems

Aspect Biosystems is a Canadian research company that was one of our ‘3D startups of the month’. It began its journey back in 2013 and has successfully patented its Lab-on-a-Printer ™ bioprinting technology since, designed to produce physiologically complex human tissues in a personalized way. The company began marketing its 3D bioprinter RX1 ™ a few years later. This machine offers flexibility and control in the 3D manufacturing of heterogeneous fabrics. Aspect Biosystems also supplies a wide range of biomaterials and various print heads.

CELLINK

CELLINK is undoubtedly one of the largest manufacturers of 3D bioprinters on the market. Since its creation in 2016, the Swedish company has developed several machines that contribute to the development of tissues and microorganisms that can be used to test new pharmaceutical and cosmetic products, with a potential future application in regenerative medicine. Its range now includes 6 bioprinters, most of them based on an extrusion process: the solutions are said to be used by more than 700 laboratories worldwide. One of its flagship models is the BIO X, which integrates 3 different print heads, making it easy to change printing techniques or use several materials. It is able to design structures from any type of cell, whether endothelial cells, strains or fibroblasts.

3d bioprinters

EnvisionTEC

The German manufacturer EnvisionTEC designs more than 40 3D printers and currently masters 6 different technologies including bioprinting. Its range of bioprinters, is available in 3 models, the 3D-Bioplotter Starter, Developer and Manufacturer. Machines can process various open biomaterials such as soft hydrogel containing polymers, ceramics, metal, etc., by applying pressure to a compressed air syringe to model tissues or organs structures. 3D-Bioplotter is mainly used in research and production in the fields of bone regeneration, cell and organic pressure, cartilage and skin production. The machines provide an accuracy on the XY axis of up to 1 µm. Depending on the model, the price can reach approximately $250,000.

Inventia

Inventia is a startup created in Australia in 2013 and specialized in the distribution of equipment and reagents for medical research using 3D bio-printing. Their machine, Rastrum, is best known for its very compact shape. It is capable of printing 3D cell models at high speed and is mainly used by health professionals and researchers to test drugs, especially for cancer treatment. It is also suitable for the creation of tissues and organs. The 3D bio-printer is equipped with a biological safety cabinet, which complies with the strictest safety standards, as well as a double HEPA filtration. Note that during the printing process, up to 8 different cell types can be used simultaneously. The machine is not commercialized but you can contact Inventia to present your research projects and work with them.

3d bioprinters

Organovo

Founded in 2007, the American company is mainly known for its research in human tissue bioprinting. In collaboration with Invetech, it has developed its 3D bio-rinter, the NovoGen MMX, which is now capable of creating tissues from the liver, kidneys, intestine, skin, pancreas and many others. It includes two print heads, one for extruding human cells, the other for a hydrogel, scaffolding or support matrix. Organovo does not market its bioprinter; it only sells it to drug manufacturers today so they can test their new products more effectively.

Poietis

Poietis is a company specialized in bioprinting fabrics based in France. Since 2016, it has accelerated its development by partnering with, for example, L’Oréal for the development of bioprinted hair, or with BASF. In October 2018, they announced the launch of their most ambitious project, their 4D bioprinting platform, called Next Generation Bioprinting (NGB), based on four unicellular resolution technologies: computer-aided design, automated and robotic bioprinting, real-time process control and tissue modeling. As a result, two 3D bioprinters were launched, the NGB-R specialized in research applications and the NGB-C specialized in clinical developments.

Regemat 3D

Created in 2011, the Spanish company has designed a REGEMAT 3D V1 bio-printer, designed for printing osteochondrial tissues and for other tissue applications. With a bioprinting volume of 150 x 150 x 100 mm, it offers a resolution of 150 microns on the XY axis and 400 nanometers on the Z axis. It includes three interchangeable heads, thus meeting a wide range of needs, from scaffolding to cell extrusion.

WeBio

The Argentine company WeBio, founded in 2018, works closely with researchers and doctors to develop solution for the field of bioprinting. For example, it has designed its third generation of 3D bioprinters. WeBio focuses primarily on projects focused on nutrition and health to achieve new breakthroughs in these areas. But the company also wants to make the drug development process more efficient by working with pharmaceutical companies to provide them with bioprinted human tissues for preclinical testing. The bioprinter is not yet available for sale.

3d bioprinters

What do you think is the future of bioprinting? Let us know in a comment below or on our Facebook and Twitter pages if the listing above was useful! Don’t forget to sign up for our free weekly Newsletter, with all the latest news in 3D printing delivered straight to your inbox!


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